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with the disconnect that i was alluding to earlier between how science deals with this question and how lawyers deal with this question is that you actually get a fundamental disconnect between the two systems. so you mentioned that lack of emotional control or lack of ability to control your preferences might lead to insanity, but, in fact, in most jurisdictions as you know, that's not true. after hanky was acquitted under the american law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental d
.org. >> when the new california academy of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting
science team. increasingly that sort of function is becoming a core function of the campaign. used to be to the extension of data it was left for fund-raising or you could buy vendors our consultants. and now, you know, people will have call them different things but there's basically the core function of a modern campaign to people, especially on the photo site, just crushing and processing data. >> if any of us were to go to the romney campaign or the obama campaign and where to look around the headquarters, how many people, is there a lot of young staff? what does it look like? >> guest: chicago, dozens of people depending i had how you define it, analytics him and then in every state they are hiring for jobs that are dated jobs, voter file managers, targeting directors, that's, you, the obama campaign will have thousands around the country and i guess hundreds of them are directly interacting with the data everyday. >> host: do you think one of the parties, republicans or the democrats, is more adept at using this technique? or are they all sort of at the same level? >> guest:
. ">>>politcal science honor society pi sigma alpha welcomed members, alumni, professors and students to the hilton hotel in downtown san jose to watch and discuss the presidential debate. society president sol jobrack was happy to see the large turnout. sol "they kind of like their candidates and hopefully this event can swing them either way." vice president ryan brewer saw this debate as a pivotal point for mitt romney and wants to see the republican take the oval office this fall. brewer "if you look at history, no president has ever won reelection with unemployment over 7.4%. today we are over eight, and i think that speaks a lot to people like me, a student thats going to be graduating in the future. i want to see someone who is good for the economy and good for my wallet." former pi sigma alpha president donna spencer is confident in president obama's plan. she thinks he is deserving of the second term in office and was excited to see the president defeat the opposition. donna "i'm here to watch the first presidential debate because i think its important that we're able to watc
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
-selling science writer will talk about the cyberworld, popular culture and computer networking as a political tool. mr. johnson is the author of eight nonfiction books including every name, were good ideas come from an the 2012 release, future perfect. >> host: steven johnson come in your newest book, in a network age, use those term pre-progressive. what is that? >> guest: it is my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i see emerging all around me. the book is really people who are trying to change the world in trying to ban progress, but he don't completely fit the existing models that we have between the left in the right or democrats and republicans. they believe in many ways that the way the internet was built, the way the web was built, the way things that wikipedia were built, using these collaborative. the works, where people come together from different points of view and openly collaborating, building ideas, that that mechanism is a tremendous engine for progress and growth. but it doesn't necessarily involve a government and doesn't necessarily involve ca
. >> it feels like a high school science project throw in the baking soda and soda and right in the taxpayer's face. medicaid and medicare are rising by 17 trillion over 75 years due to health reform. a quarter of the state's budget is toward medicaid . medicaid part of the budget rising x. four times faster. >> mark, even the democratic governors are worried. governor cuomo is saying that he doesn't have all of the cash necessary to set up the exchanges that are part of the whole plan and what are they going to do? these states are strap asked they don have the money? >> this is covered by the federal government. >> oh, yeah, how? >> they said they are going to pay it. >> is money coming down from heaven to pay this? >> they are paying 100 percent. >>> and that's how we worry? >> you are suggesting that you throw the people by the road side and let them die. >> of course not. >> and the facts is that there is a possibility of that? >> people are not dying on the streets . >> not yet. but soon. >> we can survive with our current system and we have if for years. it is going to get in more tro
near the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30
's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointeted d in the expectations that he has for himself. >> tonight the anticipation growing, about the one and only debate between the vice-presidential nominee. gas prices may be high in your hometown, but they just hit a record in one state, and keep climbing. could what's driving up the cost in california happen closer to you? and a driver plows right into a liquor store, whoa. imagine being one of the people inside. and watching that struck get away. ♪ >> i'm harris falkner, we begin tonight in florida, with the republican presidential nominee for president spending a third straight day in that state which is up for grabs. governor mitt romney at an earlily in port st. lucie and he has a major address on foreign policy tomorrow at the virginia military institute and then the governor making a promise about taxes. >> a study came out this week that showed with all his spending, and all of his borrowing and all the interest on at that debt, that he will ultimately have to raise taxes on middle income families by 4,000 a y
scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. well, it's wonderful to see all of you here for the signing, and as we kick off the signing, i will show you a clip of the film based on the book for which you came to attempt the signing. so with that said we will go right ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. >> [inaudible] >> has shocked the civilized world. more than 60 american citizens continue to be held as hostages. >> six
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
of the new england institute for cognitive science, and he is cofounder of the new england institute for cognitive science, an evolutionary study. religious studies at the university of very good. he's been an unflagging student of how human beings make their way in the world, even though that way is often not pretty. he challenges each reader to tinker with their own wiring, to be aware, and he hopes to do better. for his profound insights into the human condition and into the conditions, some humans play some others, we present him the anisfield-wolf book award for nonfiction. [applause] ♪ the night this is wonderful and i deeply appreciate the fact that such a distinguished jury read my book, much less thought it worthy of this great honor. in a moment i am going to read you an excerpt from "less than human," which deals the course of the atrocities of the past. but i think it is useful to remind ourselves that the plaintiff considering atrocities that the path is to make a better future. if we can understand what has driven us to do the terrible thing we've done to our fellow h
science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the screen. you will be watching up on the big screen as we play a game of tennis. are you ready? all right. we will select two players. that is me. does that look like me? it kind of those -- of does. does that look like mackenna? that is not by chance. you can make the person look like anything you want. they can even look like aliens. interesting. we are going to play some great tennis today. ok. one thing to tell you
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
to uphold the constitution. >> reporter: rachel caufield is a professor of political science at drake university and a research fellow at the american judicature society. she thinks it's the family leader and other conservative groups around the country, that are inserting money and politics into the judicial system. >> i think we have a movement afoot to politicize our courts and in politicizing our courts i think basically that undermines the quality of justice in america. there's definitely a trend nationwide. we've seen a huge increase in campaign spending among judicial candidates, many of whom are supported by similar interest groups. >> reporter: according to the nonpartisan group called justice at stake, from 2000 to 2009, money spent on state supreme court justice races jumped more than two and a half times to over $206 million. in iowa in 2010, money spent, mostly from out of state totaled over $1.2 million to unelect the three justices there with ads like this -- >> if they can redefine marriage none of the freedoms we hold dear are safe from judicial activism. to hold acti
, it is not rocket science, voters want mitt romney to convince them that that he has a plan to make america recover faster than president obama and that his policies will improve the lives of all americans over the next four years. he is effective when he draws contrasts between the president's failed policies and when he would do differently and reinforcing it saying, i am a principled, but practical candidate, i am willing to work across party lines to fix america's most pressing problems. >> eric: julie, what does the president need to do to bounce back? >> what he has been doing all along, you saw him leading in the polls because the president's campaign has been incredibly effective in the swig -- swing state, convincing voters that mitt romney shouldn't be trusted and nothing in romney's record as governor of massachusetts or bain capital would reflect well in the presidency. look, i will be the first to say, he bombed that debate. it was abysmal. it was a really horrible performance. there are a few more left. i am sure he won't be caught flat footed this time. and the numbers haven't shifte
science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations he has for himself. but look, i think part of that was because as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney, we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan, which was his tax cut. i don't have a tax plan that is 4.8 trillion, i am not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a voucher plan, i love teachers, i think we need more of them. don't believe me, speaker gingrich was eloquent in the primaries, saying that mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> the president had 90 minutes, now, if he had done his homework and prepared, if he had actually studied romney, why didn't he say it? virtually every analyst has said, and even your deputy campaign manager has said the charges -- was made wrong. forgetting that for a second, the job of the president is supposed to be able to be competent and to stand up for what he believes in and articulate what is wrong. mitt romney walked over him. >> and alex, you mentioned the president is air born to the golden s
train teachers. so i want to hire another 100,000 new math and science teachers. and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so that people can get trained for the jobs that are out there right now. and i want to make sure that we keep tuition low, for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is too high. so i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing, taking it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that are giving incentives for companies that are shipping jobs overseas, i want to provide tax breaks for companies that are investing here in the united states, on energy, governor romney and i both agree, we have to boost american energy production. and oil and natural gas production are higher than they have been in years. but i also believe that we have to look at the energy source of the future, like wind, solar and bio-fuels and make those investments. so all of this is possible. now, in order foritous do it, we to have to close our deficit. one of the think thises i am sure we
. let's start the national academy of sciences. let's start land-grant colleges because we want to give these gateways of opportunity for all americans because if all americans are getting opportunity, we are all going to be better off. that doesn't restrict people's freedom. that enhances it. and so what i have tried to do, as president, is to apply those same principles. when it comes to education. what visaid is, we have to reform schools that are not working, we use something call race to the top t. wasn't a top-down approach, governor. what we have said is to states, we will give you more money, if you initiate reforms. as a consequence, you had 46 states around the country who have made a real difference. but what i have also said, let's hire another 100,000 math and science teachers to make sure we maintain our technological lead and so people are skilled and able to suckicide and hard-pressed states right now can't all do that. in fact, we have seen layoffs of hundreds of thousands of teachers over the last several years. and governor romney doesn't think we need more teachers.
of economic data which are all science faction, but these are honestly constructed science fiction. >> most people don't understand, you do, obviously, but how this is done. this is a survey of 60,000 households. george, eighth a survey. it last a margin of error. >> about 400,000 jobs it could be. >> the margin is 0.2%. you could have 8% unemployment. >> the survey of employers and households and they're telling the same story of an economy that is slowly on the mend, slowly but slowly on end. >> it's a belly crawl. it's a belly crawl. you like to talk about your data, professor. here's political data. 80% or three-quarters of seniors, women, men and independents think that the obama policies did not help either their personal situation or the economy. majorities of women, men, independents and seniors and small business believe that the obama policies have hurt the economy. this is about policies. it is -- you want me to read your data. i'm saying read our data. >> the reality -- the point is that in boasting about the unemployment number, you know, the obama people are making too much ou
our police resources wisely or not using science to guide where to use our police resources. we need to look at our transportation system and revolutionize that. that will improve a lot of things, public health, public safety, commerce. so we need to be looking with a vision for the future about what we want our city to be. and i think i have done that before and like i said, i'm for prevention. and i'm for looking to the future and figuring out how we can sculpt a better san francisco and that is what i will do as supervisor. thank you, mr. davis. i want to remind folks and point out that we have seen a disturbing trend in san francisco over the past couple ever years. of years. we have had a lot of leadership appointed for us. an appointed mayor, appointed district attorney when our leaders are chosen for us instead of by us. if you want leadership in our city, i'll i'm your candidate. at juliandavis.org, there is more detail about the grassroots campaign we're building. i encourage you to look where the candidates are getting their money from. i think it says a lot about whose i
sciences and behavior and another in administration of justice. currently at san francisco state working on my bachelor's degree in justice studies and also with a minor in urban planning. the reason why i would like to be a part of the balboa park station citizen's advisory committee is because i would like to represent the voice of the community, more specifically in the development that is occurring in the area. i would also like to assist in figuring out how to keep the community voice involved and accountability with the city agencies involved and impact to make deadlines and [speaker not understood] commitments. and then, so, also john avalos is a huge advocate for our community, but it's important to have the community involved. >> thank you, ms. garcia. >>> thank you very much. >> and next we will hear mr. walker. if you would like to speak today. and are there any other applicants that were not listed? okay. oh, i'm sawyer, i thought you were not here today. >>> i'm not alex. i'm henry [speaker not understood]. >> great. so, henry, we'll hear you right after william. >>> good af
and science teacher and create more spots in the community colleges so people can get trained and i want to make sure and keep tuitition low for our young people. >> and i want to make sure everybody's christmas stocking is fill would with everything they wanted. one little problem about what he's saying not been race to the top it is not a bad program and i commend arnie duncan for rewarding poem who do well. that is different than it is economy where we punish people for doing well. i wish the president's economic policies are based on that premise and clearly they are not he said we need a 100,000 new teacher classroom is it the responsibility of the federal government to hire teacher a local school board? your schools are your responsibility in your community and state. there is nothing in the federal constitution that said the federal government ought to hire teachers for you. if you think you need more teachers hire them in your local level and let your school board decide who they are and what they teach. it was not just what the cand date said that made the difference body langua
, integrated science or integrated math which could get you to graduation, but could never get you to college. that a through g graduation requirement gave them access, so, that's one fabulous thing about this graduation requirement. the other thing is it gives them opportunity. quite frankly, d or better gives them no opportunity. a d or better says will not get them into college. a d or better. and quite frankly it's even cs and d at some colleges. so, d or better is actually not an adequate, i think, level to say that we have graduated with all fairness, have graduated our students prepared to college or a job because d or better is not prepared for college or a job. so, as a board i think if we're going to be looking at this graduation requirement should it be c or better or d or better. we're giving the numbers for both to see how much work we have to do. i think you can see on the chart even with the d or better we have much, much more work to do. this talks with black migration, african-american migration, outmigration. this is a huge factor. you are absolutely right about education, a
development, curriculum development, and also science and technology, engineering and math. some examples in the out of school time activities are kindergarten through 8 students. you see tutoring and mentoring is a key highlight. san francisco students back on track. across the cities we also have beacon centers. so, again, they have on-site services. for example, visitacion valley school and [speaker not understood]. one is more complicated. it includes teens programming. the first line is specialized out of school teen programming. what students [speaker not understood] project based learning and they get to showcase their work at the end of the curriculum. summer transition program is something that we will be funding in the upcoming funding cycle. we currently have summer programming which i'll explain a little more later. work force is a very key component to ensure us -- students succeeding in school. we have relevant learning. we have work services in the school site and also after school. [speaker not understood]. we fund 15 centers, 15 different high schools to provide holistic
not understood]. i'm a san francisco college student majoring in political science. i am the youth commissioner for district 10 appointed by supervisor malea cohen. i spent time in group homes and two consecutive years in juvenile hall. since then i've come a long way and thankful for being part of the youth commission in addition to working with the juvenile department. we heard from the youth and what they expect from the m-o-u. we share similar concerns to how you'ring out feel. we believe that including youth in the selection and valuation of the sro [speaker not understood] between our youth and officers. we, too, believe that adequate training for our police on how to deal with the city's young people will ensure safety between the police and our youth. in our historical joint hearing between the police and the youth commission on march 7th of this year we had three simple recommendations that were agreed to by the chief. one of which included an updated m-o-u and i have three here for you so you guys can see. one of which included an updated m-o-u in addition to a widespread pamphlet and
of a computer which thinks like a human is a science fiction staple, but it's entirely fictional. computers in the real world may be smart, but they're not intelligent. the same computer, for instance, capable of managing millions of netflix accounts still has a devil of a time recommending a movie that you would like. >> aa hachlt! >> scientists at silicon valley's vicarious systems are working on computers which mimic the human brain, starting with one of the most basic human abilities, the ability to see the world around you. dileep george is a long-time researcher in artificial intelligence. he's authored 22 patents and is co-founder of vicarious systems. just got millions of dollars in funding from facebook founder dustin moskovitz. thank you for being with us this morning. when is the right time to start artificial intelligence? because i think it's ten years from now when computers are better. do you follow my logic there? if you have an apple ii plus back in 1980 -- somebody help me. '81, let's say. you can say i'm going to write an artificial intelligence program that would look si
are crack pots on science and women's issues. that was a real chance for barack obama to say i have defended this whole time. >> and legislation that lets you take care of yourself. >> that to me was very striking as well as someone who works in this body that has about 10% approval rating from the american people. how do you -- >> and falling. >> exactly. how do you talk about -- i mean are you struck by how little congressional obstruction? >> essentially, romney just -- it was a game changer when he said he wants to tax the rich, regulation is essential. he cares for the poor and the elderly. what planet are we on after the two years he went through? that was when obama -- debate is about an emotional tone and connection and the issues we talk about are in service of that. that was the opportunity for obama to hold him accountable. what about mitch mcconnell who said his goal is to make me a one-term president. what about the debt ceiling where you push me over the cliff with no plan. what about the budget plan where we were about to shut out the lights in government? there was a fight fo
-span, there would be blood in the streets. >> we're going to talk about neuro science >> reporter: in the end e-health's lobbying was successful in changing the rules. low-income americans will be allowed to use their subsidies to buy insurance on e-health. did you have to write a proposed regulation to hand them? >> we've written a lot. at the end of the day the regulation didn't use all of our language. that was fine. but it caught the essence of this. and it included some things that these people in health and human services thought were important which we agreed with. >> that was a good meeting i would say that the process here is far from elegant. the process here involves influence >> you guys still do a lot of military? >> democracy is a messy way of governing yourself. and there are imperfections that people vote for bills that they don't read. they vote for words that lobby i haves have written. but it is the system that's better than any other system. we just have to make it better in my view by having more transparency. ♪ >> osgood: coming up, the cold facts. ♪ into a scooter tha
? that means the world has to be like 90% air. that's just science. think it's weird to collect air? you wouldn't think so if you saw what your lungs collect every time you breathe. people can make fun of me all they want, but i choose to see the glass half-full. of air. protect your health with life-saving air quality updates from the american lung association. get our free "state of the air" app at lung.org. ♪ john: in america of the welfare state grows and government takes more power. i hope that will change, but i'm not optimistic as thomas jefferson said, the natural progressive things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground. he said that years ago, and he has been proven right. what if there was a way to create a new kind of government, a more limited one that jefferson had in mind that helps poor people by freeing the free-market to work its magic. a free city not too far from the united states where americans could move. that may happen cent. a central american country recently signed an agreement with a group of investors to build a privately run city. its own police fo
there in the future. science, technology, and space offering technology to everybody, all the you -- all of the young ones coming up. ronald reagan is clearly the strongest leader of the free world. i will be honest with you. it is a joy to serve with a president who does not apologize for the united states of america. mr. mondale on the other hand has one idea. go out and tax the american people. he wants to wipe out the one protection that those of the lowest end of the economic scale have protecting them against being rammed into higher and higher tax brackets. we owe our country too much to go back to that kind of an approach. i would like to say something to the young people. i know what it is to have a dream and to have a job and to work hard to really participate and to the american dream. some of your finishing high school and college, some of your starting off in the workplace. we want america oppose the greatest grift -- america's greatest griffeift. it is absolutely essential that we guarantee the young people that the they will not know the agony of war. gift, opportunity and peace. we mu
puts the technology in the hands of women themselves. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >>> it's estimated 3,000 women around the world are infected with h.i.v. every day. a imagine of those cases are in sub sahara, africa. but now this team in menlo park are developing a gel they believe will cut those numbers dramatically. >> it's a two-part gel. when applied to the site, it will stick for such a long time, at the same time it is two drugs, one effective against hiv and the other effective. >> it is to protect women during intercourse from hiv and hsv, a form of genital herpes also rampant in africa. it would be an alternative in male-dominated cultures that sometimes discourage the use of condoms. >> therefore you want to empower the women to take charge of their own health. >> the project recently received a boost from the national institute of health. in july it awarded them a half million dollars grant to fund the research for two years. >> they believe the combination therapy could be particularly effective because hsv-2 infections leave women more vulne
i've ever seen in my life. >> reporter: the science of destruction, a picture-perfect crash, a wrecked jetliner and a treasure trove of new information about what it takes to survive the unthinkable. for "good morning america," neal karlinsky, abc news, detroit. >> so don't sit in first class. >> yeah. >> and don't hold your baby in your lap. >> and buy an extra seat for that child. yeah. >> fascinating report. our thanks to neal karlinsky and "curiosity plane crash" airs on the discovery channel tonight. >>> coming up here on "good morning america," open wide, the innovative solution one family found for the baby who just would not eat. ♪ gangnam style [ male announcer ] at walgreens, we know kids share all kinds of things, especially germs. that's why you always get your flu shot. this year, walgreens will do you one better, and check if there are any other immunizations you might need -- absolutely free, no appointment necessary. preparing you for years of unplanned sharing to come. at walgreens and take care clinics, we've got all kinds of ways to arm yourself for flu
. with schools. i want to hire another 100,000 new math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs that are out there. i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. manufacturing. i want to close loopholes that companies shipping jobs overseas. oil and natural gas production have been higher than they have been in years. we have to look at the energy those investments. all of this is possible. we have to close our deficit. we will discuss how we deal with our tax code and how we make sure we are reducing spending in a response away and have enough revenue to make those investments. governor romney's central economic plan calls for a $5 trillion tax cut on top of the extension of the bush tax cut. $2 trillion in additional military spending -- without dumping the cost on the middle-class americans. that is one of the central questions of this campaign. >> you have spoken about a lot of different things. governor romney, do you have a said? you're talking about. we have to provide tax relief to people in
in their food. so are we. we want to provide fact-based information to consumers that have some basis in science. but even the proponents of prop 37 agree that would be putting skull and cross bones on the label. that's when the founder of the proposition says. scientists agree that genetically en neared food are safe. even the american medical association voted to say that there is no concern. >> but the concern is that there is not enough research being done, things like allergens and what not. these products have been around for a couple of decades about but maybe that's not enough. >> there have been studies done, more than 400 studies done. and as you pointed out, they have been in the food supply for decades. we have eaten trillions and trillions pound of genetically engineered food. this is about prop 37. don't believe me, but the overwhelming majority of editorial boards in california have urged voters to reject it. >> okay. we are talking a lot about labeling. >> right. >> you said you had other concerns. you said out of the gate that this was not just about labeling. what are the other
are safe, they have been endorsed by the national academy of sciences, the world health organization and the american medical association voted at the annual meeting three months ago in june that there is no special labeling needed for bioengineering food. >> a lot of concern is that there is not enough research that has been done. things like allergens and whatnot. the products have been around a couple of decades but maybe that is not enough to know long- term effects. >> there have been studies done, more than 400 studies and they have been in the food supply for 20-plus years and we have eaten trillions and trillions of servings. there has been no scientifically based problems with this food. and really, you know, this is more than just a debate about genetically engineered food. this is about proposition 37. about a measure on the ballot on november 6th and people who have looked at it not just our campaign, don't believe me, but the overwhelming majority of editorial boards in california have urged the voters to reject that. >> okay, we are talking a lot about labeling. >> yeah
the technology in the hands of women themselves. health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >>> it's estimated 3,000 women around the world are infected with h.i.v. every day. a imagine of those cases are in sub sahara, africa. but now this team in menlo park are developing a gel they believe will cut those numbers dramatically. >> it's a two-part gel. when applied to the site, it will stick for such a long time, at the same time it is two drugs, one effective against hiv and the other effective. >> it is to protect women during intercourse from hiv and hsv, a form of genital herpes also rampant in africa. it would be an alternative in male-dominated cultures that sometimes discourage the use of condoms. >> therefore you want to empower the women to take charge of their own health. >> the project recently received a boost from the national institute of health. in july it awarded them a half million dollars grant to fund the research for two years. >> they believe the combination therapy could be particularly effective because hsv-2 infections leave women more vulnerable to contract
was once science-fiction but a multi-user space port with horizontal launch and landing capabilities as well as the facilities that we have available from shuttle along with this outstanding work force that's available down here to help make that transition. >> now, the dragon capsule is carrying about 1,000 pounds of cargo, everything from food to scientific experiments. if for some reason, fredricka, they can't get off the ground foen tonight, if the weather interrupts them, they will try again tomorrow, which is tomorrow, columbus day. which is kind of fitting, exploration on columbus day. >> i see the title. sounds good. thanks so much. >>> it sounds impossible, but a seasoned skydiver is out to set a world record when he jumps out of a balloon 23 miles up. both presidential campaigns are aimed at undecided voters. we'll size up that important group. online outfit piccolo headphones buy now broadway show megapixels place to sleep little roadster war and peace deep sea diving ninja app hipster glasses 5% cash back sign up to get 5% everywhere online through december. only from dis
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